GAMIFICATION AND USER EXPERIENCE FOR MINIMAL VIABLE PRODUCTS

We are still exploring the Founders Toolkit in the TechTribe Community and on Thursday, the 11th of November we hosted an interactive Masterclass on ‘Gamification and user experience for Minimal Viable Products’ with Hanno Van Der Merwe, UX Team Lead at {type}DEV.
In this interactive masterclass, Hanno took a deep dive into several academic models that equip one to plan and implement well-constructed user experience and design principles, complimented by an understanding of gamified techniques to engage users to adopt desired behaviours and habits.

Key Points from the Masterclass

Octalysis Framework

The Octalysis Framework has identified 8 core drives:

  • Developed by Yu-kai Chou, Founding Partner/Chief Creation officer of The Octalysis Group
  • Helping your engage your customers in:
  • Product Experiences
  • Workplace Engagement
  • Marketing
  • Social Engagement
  • Education Gamification
  • Lifestyle Gamification
  • Epic Meaning and Calling
  • Development and Accomplishment
  • Empowerment of Creativity and Feedback
  • Ownership and Possession
  • Social Influence and Relatedness
  • Scarcity and Impatience
  • Unpredictability and Curiosity
  • Loss and Avoidance



Gamification is Psychology; it is driving user behaviour by making work fun.

Epic Meaning and Calling

Development and Accomplishment

Empowerment of Creativity and Feedback

  • Giving users the ability to do something that they wouldn’t be able to do without our intervention.
  • That they are empowered by our invention.
  • Video example: https://youtu.be/bo99JjnfdA8

Ownership and Possession

  • We want people to see the processes as their own.
  • We want them vested in the outcomes because the outcomes matter to them because it is theirs, it affects them.

Video example: https://youtu.be/uua7Xx5iCWw

Social Influence and Relatedness

  • What others think of you, the social influence they have on you changes how you think
  • Ways to include social interaction into your application is by adding in leader boards.
  • Video example: https://youtu.be/sno1TpCLj6A

Scarcity and Impatience

Unpredictability and Curiosity

Loss and Avoidance

  • Giving users something and telling them that they need to adopt this particular behaviour where you’re going to use it.
  • Video example: https://youtu.be/5uWD4i8u-KU

The Structure of this Framework

How to price your services

Pricing Canvas

  • 10 levers for 10-5-% annual growth
  • Pricing new products
  • Pricing product portfolios and platforms
  • Innovating revenue and pricing models
  • Transforming into SaaS models
  • Monetizing growth, scale, and expansion
  • Developed by Esra Kucukciftci, founder of Pricing Innovations

Acquire Net New Business

  • Channel Strategy
  • Product Structure
  • Offer Structure
  • Product Strategy

Product Structure

  • Who are you targeting?
  • 80% of your sales comes from 20% of your market
  • Look at channel partners who’s networks you can leverage

Product Strategy

Roman Pilcher, the product management expert, suggests a product strategy should contain three key elements:
– First, the market for the product and the specific needs it will address
– Secondly, the product’s key differentiators and unique selling proposition
– Lastly, the company’s business goals for the product
Start with your growth strategy
Will growth primarily come from…
• acquiring net new customers,
• monetizing your customer base differently,
• increasing probability or
• driving your market share

Offer Structure

Look at your product the way your users do

  • People don’t want to buy your app or service
  • They want the outcome/results
  • They are searching for the perfect solution to do the job
  • Products come and go, but the underlying jobs to be done do not go away
  • What job is your product hired to do?

 

Step 1: Identify the jobs that your user is trying to get done

  • Identify which job have an insufficient/ad-hock solution

Step 2: Capitalize on the jobs to be done

  • Main jobs
  • Related jobs

Offer Structure

Look at your product the way your users do

  • People don’t want to buy your app or service
  • They want the outcome/results
  • They are searching for the perfect solution to do the job
  • Products come and go, but the underlying jobs to be done do not go away
  • What job is your product hired to do?

 

Step 1: Identify the jobs that your user is trying to get done

  • Identify which job have an insufficient/ad-hock solution

 

Step 2: Capitalize on the jobs to be done

  • Main jobs
  • Related jobs

 

Step 3: Find Competitions

  • Learn from both your direct and indirect competitors

 

Step 4: Create Job Statement

  • Action + Object + Context
  • Take + customer orders + in the Fine Dining Restaurant

 

 

Step 5: Identify the jobs to be done opportunities

  • How Important?
  • How Satisfied?

 

 

Step 6: List the jobs to be done Related Outcome Expectation

  • Desired outcomes customers want to achieve
  • Undesired outcomes customers want to avoid
  • Desired outcomes providers want to achieve
  • Undesired outcomes providers want to avoid.

 

Step 7: Create outcome statements

 

 

Define your milestones

When you have an MVP work it out in a way that you are always moving forward

Bringing it all together

Step 1: Identify your jobs to be done

Step 2: Prioritize these jobs in terms of user needs, technological barriers and development time required

Step 3: Apply the Octalysis framework to each job individually to ensure user will adopt each phase

Step 4: Break the rollout of these up into milestones/releases, ensuring each milestone has a healthy spread of motivators

QUESTIONS & ANSWERS

Q: What apps can you recommend as games to help learning disabled people?

A: There are a number of them, one that I came across the other day is called Be My Eyes. With Be My Eyes, two different types of users can register for the application. The first is people who have visibility deficiencies from completely blind to people who just struggle to see a little bit, then the part of the user base are people who volunteer to assist these people. You take your phone as the blind person and simply point it at the thing that you’re trying to make out. Let’s say you want to know which of the products on the shelf is sugar-free because you might also be Diabetic. you need to know which of these products you need to buy. The person helping you sees on the camera what you’re looking at and they tell you it’s the one to the right or the one to the left, it’s a blue one or it’s a grey one. And so by getting people to adopt these behaviours on the game, meaning something bigger than myself, we have these people registering helping help these people with deficiencies.

Q: How do you strike a balance between gamification but still give a strong professional or corporate experience?

A: The trick with gamification is you should not make your users necessarily know that’s what you’re doing. What you want to do is you want to make it so natural and so much harder that some thinks this is just how it works. It’s fun and it’s easy to do again it’s psychology it’s not about games and this I think is where a lot of people misunderstand the concept or point of gamification. We want to bring play into your life in your daily work and that’s how you do it anyway you want to see how quickly can I close all my tickets for the day I want to close more tickets than my colleagues, I want to be the first I want to be the best. And that’s a natural thing and so leverage those natural rights that people have to want to engage and use that to develop technology around that. And the Octalysis framework is a way that you can identify ways in which you can do so.

Q: A lot of examples that I have seen where gamification has worked successfully is in America or European markets. There are some African exceptions like Nike and Vitality, but they are not the rule is this because African start-ups have not fully exploited or explored gamification or because the African market isn’t as suited or ready to gamification or perhaps a combination of both?

A: I would say that obviously in countries where the technology is more prevalent it’s rolled out quicker, but I’ve seen a lot of examples. We in fact at {type}DEV have used a lot of examples where we apply gamification to our document, to our applications that we build. We have for instance built an application where for African Unity Life, one of our big clients we have an insurance forum where you can create an avatar of your family members as you take out the policy for each of your family members. So we’re getting you to play a little bit with different characters that you can build with them trying to make it represent your children and your wife and everyone else. We get you to stay on the forum longer and want to fill in the information that we put on there. So I think that as the technology becomes more prevalent privilege and they say that more than 70% of the people in South Africa, even in rural areas have smartphones I think we’re going to see a lot more of it’s happening in our country as well.

Q: People are concerned that gamification could be expensive it could be time consuming and as a builder of an MVP you want to minimize on cost, you and minimize on time spent. So how best can gamification be implemented but in a cost and time effective way?

A: So it depends on how you deep you want to go into it. There’s a couple of simple ways that you can do a little bit of gamification for instance feedback putting a progress bar in a form, that is not expensive that’s going to be only a little bit of extra development time. So I’m hoping that some of the examples that I’ve showed you today shows you that gamification doesn’t need to be expensive it’s about thinking of how you get users to interact with your content it’s psychology it’s not games. It’s really just saying that well instead of just doing x I’m going to do x a little bit of y, but the other thing that I also want to stress, and this is something that I rushed over a little bit towards the end is, you want to put down your milestones. You want to understand that alright for the skateboard version of my application I’m going to have something very simple, I’m going to have something very cheap, but I’m going to monetize. I’m going to find ways of making sure that the jobs to be done that I’ve included in my skateboard version are so attractive and so necessary that I’m going to get enough users that it will be able to fund the next version. And then you can incorporate some more flamboyance and some more time sensitive or some time intensive implementations of a better version thereof.
So if you’re concerned about what something is going to cost. dumb it down, break it down to its base component parts and spend the minimum amount of time on it with the understanding that in the scooter version, in the bicycle version, in the motorbike version, you’re going to have a different implementation of this. And by the time we reach a supercar it’s going to be perfected into what we imagined it to be at the beginning.

Missed this masterclass? Catch up here:

The next {type}DEV Masterclass is happening on 25 November 2021 on Strategic Product Design by Yi Yu (Bruce) Liu, Senior Digital Strategist at {type}DEV. Register here